The 1975: A Discussion Into the Most Extra, Pompous, Self-Indulgent Band That We Love

BY CASSIDY GRADY

It's June 1st, and if you are a rectangle-worshiping fan of British pop band The 1975, then you know what that means, or should I say, you have absolutely no clue what that means. So, in turn, you have to be prepared for absolutely anything that this band is about to slap you in the face with.

The band first disappeared on June 1st of 2015, returning from their black-and-white post punk days as a pink pop band for the release of I Like It When You Sleep, for You Are So Beautiful yet So Unaware of It.  The album was extremely versatile, ranging from frilly, pompous pop-rock tracks like "Love Me" and "The Sound" to "If I Believe You," a swinging track which is accompanied with a church choir in the background. Other hits off the album included the hip-hop inspired tune "Loving Someone" as well as somber melancholy pop jams "Somebody Else" and "A Change of Heart." Since the announcement of the I Like It When You Sleep album, June 1st has always been the most important day of the year for The 1975 and fans everywhere.

Fans never know what to expect on June 1st, and this year was no different. Things finally began to become more (or less?) clear at the end of April, when a photo was posted onto their Instagram that contained a poem. The top of the photo revealed what would soon be known as their next album title: A Brief Inquiry into Online Relationships. The band announced through social media that new music would drop on June 1st, and at first, we anticipated an entire album, but later learned it would only be a single titled "Give Yourself a Try." Although being initially excited by the news, everyone was awaiting the new single with the looming fear that it would be a disappointment. The band was counting down to June 1st on their website, and fans were watching anxiously.

 PHOTO: The 1975 /  Instagram

PHOTO: The 1975 / Instagram

The highly anticipated new single premiered May 31st on BBC Radio 1. Just minutes before the new single finally dropped, front-man Matty Healy conducted an interview with BBC Radio 1's Annie Mac, and fans finally got the information they deserved after months of dealing with cryptic messages, and what seemed like meaningless stock photos that flooded the band's Instagram feed. This is what we learned from the interview:

  1. "Music for Cars" is the "next" era for The 1975, and will consist of 2 albums which will be released within 6 months of each other.  A Brief Inquiry into Online Relationships will be dropping this October, and Notes on a Conditional Form will be released around May of 2019.
  2. The band will start touring in January of 2019, and will be touring "for fu**ing ever."
  3. According to a statement by Healy during the interview, The 1975 will "never stop making records." Fans can rest easy knowing that the band will be with us for a long time.
 PHOTO: The 1975 /  Instagram

PHOTO: The 1975 / Instagram

Now, let's discuss the bomb that was dropped on us the evening of May 31st. Within the first 10 seconds of the new single "Give Yourself a Try," fans were already relieved. Highly anticipated disappointment quickly disappeared with an opening constructed of Joy Division-like guitar riffs, which were exactly what we didn't know we needed from this band. A quick pause at the very beginning of the song builds excitement, leading to Healy's entrance with the vocals. The lyrics come in, and are brilliantly heavy. Healy references his drug abuse, modern day politics, and a fan who committed suicide a few years back. He also references a track titled "Woman" from The 1975's self-titled debut album, which was about his experience with a prostitute. 

Even the jokes and silly moments that appear throughout the song are realized to make light of not-so-light issues. The vocals at first appeared far too clean and overproduced, but there is a really well thought out juxtaposition between these poppy vocals, the heavy lyrics, and the post-punk instrumentation. The feeling of the song seems to be a distraction from the heaviness of the actual lyrics, which mirrors the theme of the photos they have been posting. This theme is emphasized when the tune is paired with the music video, which dropped just hours later. You can watch the video here.

 PHOTO: The 1975 /  Instagram

PHOTO: The 1975 / Instagram

At the end of the day, there are still so many unanswered questions. "Music for Cars" was an EP released by the band way back in 2013: the third of four EPs dropped before their self-titled debut album. Does the connection between the name of this era and their 2013 EP mean something? What does it mean, if anything? When will the tour dates drop and what cities are The 1975 hitting? Will there be pop-up shops any time soon, like before? In what direction is the Music for Cars aesthetic heading? Is the anti-technology theme self-aware and ironic?

Unfortunately, every answered question just seems to reveal 10 more unanswered questions. As bystanders, we have grown to notice that this is what it is like being a fan of the most extra, pompous, self-indulgent, yet humble, brilliant, and self-aware band out there. After hearing that single, fans everywhere are looking forward to this October, upcoming tours, and any other surprises The 1975 is likely to throw our way. Happy June 1st.

Lead Image Credit: Pinterest